Sparc CPU chart

CPU Type

 SPARC64-VII+ (M3)  T3 T4 T5 M5  M10/SPARC64-X

Servers

M3000, M4000,
M5000, M8000,
M9000,
M9000-64

T3-1, T3-2
T3-4 

T4-1, T4-2
T4-4
T5-2, T5-4
T5-8
M5-32 M10-1, M10-4, 
M10-4S

CPU Core Codename

Jupiter++ S2 S3 S3 S3 Athena
CPU Clockfrequency 2.66-3 GHz 1.65 GHz 2.85-3GHz 3.6 GHZ 3.6 GHZ  2.8-3 GHz
Number of Cores per socket 4 16

 8 

16 6 16
Number of Threads per core 2 8

 8 

8 8 2
Minimum amount of RAM,
number of sockets,
and threads per Server

 8GB
1 socket
8 threads

8GB
1 socket
128 threads

 16GB
1 socket
64 threads

256GB
2 sockets
256 threads
1TB
8 sockets
384 threads
32GB
1 socket
4 threads (2 cores activated from 16)
Maximum amount of RAM, number

of sockets and threads per Server

4TB
64 sockets
512 threads 

128 GB
4 sockets
512 threads

2TB
4 sockets
256 threads 

4TB
8 sockets
1024 threads
32 TB
32 sockets
1536 threads
32TB
64 sockets
2048 threads
L3 Cache no L3$
(12MB L2$ though!)
no L3$

4MB

8MB 48MB no L3$
(24MB shared L2$ though!)

Virtualization supported

Dynamic Domains
(and Zones)

LDoms
(and Zones)

LDoms
(and Zones) 

LDoms
(and Zones) 
Hard Domains, 
LDoms
(and Zones) 
LDoms
(and Zones) 

CPU architecture (ISA)

sun4u sun4v sun4v sun4v sun4v sun4v

 OS supported

Solaris 10, 11 Solaris 10, 11 Solaris 10, 11 Solaris 10, 11 Control Domain: S11 only.
Guest Domains: Solaris 10, 11
Solaris 10, 11

noteworthy features

electronically separated domains 512 threads in 2010! First S3 based, single thread AND throughput 1024 threads in 8 RU
Mainframe class,
Mission critical
Software on Chip

Make Watchdog reset force a Coredump

When a system becomes unresponsive, without any messages provided for diagnosis of the problem, the deadman kernel code can be enabled to force a core dump during the systems unresponsive period. However if the system is equipt with an ALOM, there is a function known as the ALOM watchdog which will reset them system according to set perameters when the system goes unresponsive. By default the watchdog will just power cycle the system, however this gathers no addition as to the cause of the unresponsive period for the system.

You can set the watchdog to dump a corefile however with the following command:

set sys_autorestart=dumpcore

This effectively will turn the LOM watchdog into the deadman timer.

System won’t boot. But I have an OK prompt

System won’t boot. But I have an OK prompt

1. Can you run the banner?
ok banner

2. Can the Machine boot from CDROM into Single User Mode?
#boot cdrom -s
– YES – but fails to boot to the boot disk, then there is a software problem with the OS on the boot disk.
– NO – then it is most likely a Hardware Problem.

a. Verify that the boot cd is a supported OS for this system.
b. Try to boot the exact same OS CD as is loaded on the boot disk.

3. Have any changes been made to the system since it last booted correctly?
– Patches applied, Packages added, Hardware installed or removed

4. Are you getting past the banner and ok prompt?

5. Can you see your boot device from the ok prompt?
ok setenv auto-boot? false
ok reset
ok probe-scsi-all
-or-
ok probe-ide-all

6. Are you attempting to boot from your default boot device?
ok printenv boot-device
ok devalias {output from previous command}
ok boot -v
– Now just watch to make sure that the output from the devalias command matches the device that the system is attempting to boot from.

7. Is the system automatically attempting to boot from your diag device (net by default)?
ok printenv diag-device
ok setenv diag-switch? false

NOTES:

A. If the diag-switch OBP variable is set to true, then the machine will attempt to boot from the diag-device which is usually different from the default boot device. Set the diag-switch to false.

B. If the system hangs at the "twirly bird" ( | / – \ ) or the configuring devices statement, then there may be hardware on the system that is not recognized or is failed.

C. If the system comes up and stops at the maintenance prompt (press control-d for normal start-up or enter root password for system maintenance) the files systems need to be fsck’ed. Enter the root password and fsck the filesystems.

Enter Root Password: ******
#fsck -y /dev/rdsk/cXtXdXsX

D. If the root drive is encapsulated or under control of a volume management utility, then the issue needs to be handled as a storage issue.

SSH and ALOM V240

SSH and ALOM V240 / V210

Unfortunately there is no support for SSH in 1.x Versions, so there is
no way to configure or workaround it.

The network management port does not support ssh,The ALOM is very simple
and only understands basic protocols.

DCE to DTE serial connections

DCE equipment is typically a modem or other type of communication device. The DCE sits between the DTE (data terminal equipment) and a transmission circuit such as a phone line. Originally, the DTE was a dumb terminal or printer, but today it is a computer, or a bridge or router that interconnects local area networks. In an IBM mainframe environment, a communication controller and a link-attached cluster controller are examples of DTEs.

A DCE provides a connection for the DTE into a communication network and back again. In addition, it terminates and provides clocking for a circuit. When analog telephone lines are the communication media, the DCE is a modem. When the lines are digital, the DCE is a CSU/DSU (channel service unit/data service unit).

DTE and DCE interfaces are defined by the physical layer in the OSI (Open Systems Interconnection) model. The most common standards for DTE/DCE devices are EIA (Electronic Industries Association) RS-232-C and RS-232-D. Outside the United States, these standards are the same as the V.24 standard of the CCITT (Consultative Committee for International Telegraphy and Telephony). Other DTE/DCE standards include the EIA RS-366-A, as well as the CCITT X.20, X.21, and V.35 standards. The later standards are used for high-speed communication over telephone lines.

DTE and DCE devices send and receive data on separate wires that terminate at a 25-pin connector. It is useful to know that DTE devices transmit on pin connector 2 and receive on pin 3. DCE devices are just the opposite-pin 3 transmits and pin 2 receives.

For pinouts see:
http://www.dracko.com/index.php?s=page&n=show_post&id=417

The serial pin designations were originally intended for connecting a dumb terminal to a modem. The terminal was DTE (Data Terminal Equipment) and the modem was DCE (Data Communication Equipment). Today the PC is usually used as DTE instead of a terminal (but real terminals may still be used this way). The names of the pins are the same on both DTE and DCE. The words: "receive" and "transmit" are from the "point of view" of the PC (DTE). The transmit pin from the PC transmits to the "transmit" pin of the modem (but actually the modem is receiving the data from this pin so from the point of view of the modem it would be a receive pin).

The serial port was originally intended to be used for connecting DTE to DCE which makes cabling simple: just use a straight-thru cable. Thus when one connects a modem one seldom needs to worry about which pin is which. But people wanted to connect DTE to DTE (for example a computer to a terminal) and various ways were found to do this by fabricating various types of special null-modem cables. In this case what pin connects to what pin becomes significant.

Set up V490 service processor

The rscadm utility and its subcommands allow administration of Sun Remote System Control (RSC) from the host. You must log in to the server as root to use rscadm.

Installation places the rscadm utility in the following directory:

/usr/platform/platform-name/rsc/

You can obtain the string to use for platform-name using the Solaris command
uname -i.

resetrsc [-s]

This subcommand resets RSC immediately. To terminate all connections cleanly before the reset, use the -s option. If no argument is supplied, this subcommand performs a hard reset and drops all connections.

Note – When you reset RSC on a Sun Enterprise 250 server without also resetting the server, RSC time defaults to 1/1/70. To synchronize RSC time with server time, reset the server, use the rscadmcommand rscadm date -s, or run the script /usr/platform/platform-name/rsc/rsc-initscript. You can obtain the string to use for platform-nameusing the Solaris command uname -i.

Redirect console to RSC

To use the RSC card the system administrator needs to redirect the console to the RSC. Certain faults are undiagnosable if the console log at the time of failure is not captured. Once the RSC is setup as the console device this vital data is captured automatically. In addition the system can be powered off and on remotely making remote management much easier.

After downloading and installing the RSC packages setup the RSC card from Solaris using the rsc-config command.

/usr/platform/`uname -i`/rsc/rsc-config

Confirm you are able to login to the RSC card via the RSC serial or the network connection. Once remote login to the RSC card is working you can setup the console redirection. From the ok prompt run the following commands, have a session open to the console on the RSC card as once you reset-all the POST output will be output to the console.

ok setenv diag-out-console true

ok setenv input-device rsc-console

ok setenv output-device rsc-console

ok reset-all

The same changes could be made from Solaris using the eeprom command, the changes would take affect at the next reboot.

# eeprom diag-out-console=true

# eeprom input-device=rsc-console

# eeprom output-device rsc-console

Switching the console back to TTYA

If you need to redirect the console back to TTYA there are a number of options. OBP 4.15.x introduced “Service mode”, after shutting down the system turn the keyswitch to the diagnostics position and power on. The console will be redirected to the ttya serial port until the keyswitch is returned to normal and the system is reset. This was introduced to allow engineers sent to site to more easily work on the systems without requiring knowledge of the customer RSC passwords.

Alternatively if a more persistent solution is required you can set the individual OBP variables back to the defaults:

ok setenv diag-out-console false

ok setenv input-device keyboard

ok setenv output-device screen

If access to Solaris and the RSC card is not available as a last resort the RSC card can be removed. This will temporarily reset the console output to the TTYA port. Once the OBP has been started, the parameters will need to be reset appropriately until the RSC card has been configured.

SUN serial port pinouts

SUN serial port pinouts

Sun ELC and SLC CPU serial ports:[Pin ID]
The Sun part number is for the ELC serial port splitter cable is X985Q. The SLC serial port splitter cable is Sun part # 530-1667. The pinout below is from the May 1993 Sun FE Handbook.

Pin Signal Port Pin Signal Port
2 TD A 13 CTS B
3 RD A 14 TD B
4 RTS A 15 TC A
5 CTS A 16 RD B
6 DSR A 17 RC A
7 GND A 19 RTS B
8 DCD A 20 DTR A
12 DCD B 24 TCO A

SPARCstation 2:[Pin ID] The SPARCstation 2 has 2 DB25, 25-pin serial ports:

Pin Signal Description
2 TxD output
3 RxD input
4 RTS output
5 CTS input
6 DSR input
7 GND
8 DCD input
20 DTR output

Ultra 1/ 2/ 30/ 60, Enterprise 150/ 220R/ 250/ 3000/ 3500/ 4500/ 5000/ 5500/ 6500, Netra t 1120/ 1125/ 1400/ 1405, SPARCstation 5: [Pin ID] These machines have 2 DB25, 25-pin RS-423/RS-232 serial ports:

Pin Signal Description
2 TxD output Transmit Data
3 RxD input Receive Data
4 RTS output Request to Send
5 CTS input Clear to Send
6 DSR input Data Set Ready
7 GND Ground
8 DCD input Data Carrier Detect
9-14 none Not connected
15 TRxC input1 Transmit Clock input1
16 none Not connected
17 RTxC input2 Receive Clock2
18-19 none Not connected
20 DTR output Data Terminal Ready
21-23 none Not connected
24 TxC output3 Transmit Clock output3
25 none Not Connected

Notes:
1 Enterprise 6500/5500/4500/3500/3000 labels this as DB. 2 Enterprise 6500/5500/4500/3500/3000 labels this as DD. 3 Enterprise 6500/5500/4500/3500/3000 labels this as DA.

Enterprise 420R: [Pin ID] This machine has 2 DB25, 25-pin RS-423/RS-232 serial ports:

Pin Signal Description
2 TxD output Transmit Data
3 RxD input Receive Data
4 RTS output Request to Send
5 CTS input Clear to Send
6 DSR input Data Set Ready
7 GND Ground
8 DCD input Data Carrier Detect
9 BUTTON_POR To be determined
10 BUTTON_XIR_L To be determined
11 +5Vdc +5 VDC
12-14 none Not connected
15 TRxC input Transmit Clock
16 none Not connected
17 RTxC input Receive Clock
18-19 none Not connected
20 DTR output Data Terminal Ready
21-23 none Not connected
24 TxC output Transmit Clock
25 none Not Connected

Ultra 5/ 10: [Pin ID] Port A is a DB25, Port B is a DB9:

Serial Port A (DB25)
Pin Signal Description
2 TxD output Transmit Data
3 RxD input Receive Data
4 RTS output Request to Send
5 CTS input Clear to Send
6 DSR input Data Set Ready
7 GND Ground
8 DCD input Data Carrier Detect
9-14 none Not connected
15 TRxC input Transmit Clock
16 none Not connected
17 RTxC input Receive Clock
20 DTR output Data Terminal Ready
21-23 none Not connected
24 TxC output Transmit Clock
25 none Not Connected

Serial Port B (DB9)
Pin Signal Description
1 CD Carrier Detect
2 RD Receive Data
3 TD Transmit Data
4 DTR Data Terminal Ready
5 GND Ground
6 DSR Data Set Ready
7 RTS Request to Send
8 CTS Clear to Send
9 RI Ring Indicator

Netra ft 1800: [Pin ID]
The Netra ft 1800 has 1 female DB25 Console Port, 1 female DB25 Modem Port, and 1 female DB9 Remote Control Processor (RCP) Port.

Modem port (DB25)
Pin Signal
1 Ground
2 TxD
3 RxD
4 RTS
5 CTS
7 SREF (Signal Reference)
8 DCD
20 DTR
Shield Ground

Console port (DB25)
Pin Signal Description
1 GND Chassis Ground
2 TxD Output Data
3 RxD Input Data
7 SREF Signal Reference
Shield — Chassis Ground

RCP port (DB9)
Pin Signal
2 TxD
3 RxD
5 SREF (Signal Reference)
Shield Ground

Netra X1, 1280, t1 Model 105/AC200/DC200, Sun Fire V100/ V120/ V480/ V1280: [Pin ID] These machines have RJ45 connectors for serial ports.

Modems: The V100 and V120 have no DCD line on their serial ports, but they map DSR to DCD on at least port B. (Strange, but true). We do not believe that you can put a modem on the Netra X1, 1280, t1 Model 105/AC200/DC200, or Sun Fire V480 or V1280.

Configure the modem cable on Port B with the pinout shown to the right.

Sun InfoDoc 47436, available via login to contract customers only, at sunsolve.sun.com has a bit more information on setting up a modem for the V100/V120.

Signal RJ45 DB25 Modem
RTS 1 — 4
DTR 2 — 20
TXD 3 — 2
Signal Ground 4 — 1
Signal Ground 5 — 7
RXD 6 — 3
DSR(DCD) 7 — 8
CTS 8 — 5

On the Netra X1 and Sun Fire V100, Port A LOM is dedicated to the Lights Out Management (LOM) device in the server. The Netra 1280/Sun Fire V1280 machines reserve port B for some non-user use. Only use port A.

One of this site’s readers says that the Cisco Modem RJ45 – DB25 adapter works just fine as a replacement for the Sun adapter with a terminal on the console port of an X1. It probably works well with the other systems listed in this section, too. The Cisco adapter is light grey, embossed with MODEM CAB-5MODCM on one side and 29-0881-01 on the other.

RJ45 – DB25 RS232 serial converter cable, RJ45 – DB9 serial cable: Below are pinouts for an RJ45 – DB25 RS232 serial converter cable, part number 530-2889-01 and a RJ45 – DB9 serial cable, part number 530-3100-xx. (There is also an unknown part number which has the same pinout except that the RJ45 BODY (black) is wired to RS232 pin 1 GND.)

Note that these are wired DCE. If you use the supplied RJ45 to DB25 RS232 adapter, you get a null-modem cable, suitable for a terminal connection.

Machine Sun serial DB25 Machine DB9 adapter
RJ45 RS-232 adapter RJ45 RS-232 Pin
Pin part # 530-2889-01 Pin part # 530-3100-xx
1 (RTS) blue — 5 (CTS) 1 (RTS) blue — 8 (CTS)
2 (DTR) orange — 6 (DSR) 2 (DTR) orange — 6 (DSR)
3 (TXD) black — 3 (RXD) 3 (TXD) black — 2 (RXD)
4 (GND) red — 7 (GND) 4 (GND) red — 5 (GND)
5 (GND) green — 7 (GND) 5 (GND) green — 5 (GND)
6 (RXD) yellow — 2 (TXD) 6 (RXD) yellow — 3 (TXD)
7 (DSR) brown — 20 (DTR) 7 (DSR) brown — 4 (DTR)
8 (CTS) gray — 4 (RTS) 8 (CTS) gray — 7 (RTS)

V100 – Xylogics Remote Annex 4000 Series: A reader sent us this pinout for connecting a Sun V100 to a Xylogics Remote Annex 4000 Series. (This cable pinout will connect the Annex to the RSC card on any Enterprise and Sun Fire level servers as well as the V440. It’s not just for the V100.)

Check the signal names and pin numbers for the port on your Annex model, because the pinouts vary. Match the signal names to determine your wiring needs.

V100 LOM RJ45 ANNEX RJ45
Pin Signal Pin Signal
8 CTS — 1 RTS
7 DSR — 2 DTR
6 RXD — 3 TXD
4 GND — 6 GND
3 TXD — 5 RXD
2 DTR — 7 DSR
1 RTS — 8 CTS

Vx Series Servers – Avocent CPS-810/1600 series console servers: A reader sent us this pinout for connecting Sun Vx Series Servers to Avocent CPS-810/1600 series console servers.

Adaptor Part # 210105, 10′ Reversing Cable Part # 690226

The following diagram shows the pinout for a CPS flatwire to SUN serial RJ45 connection; it can be used to create a custom adaptor cable between the units. This should work on all SUN servers with an RJ45 serial connection.

CPS SUN
Pin Signal Pin Signal
1 RTS ———— 8 CTS
2 DSR ———— 2 DTR
3 CD –Not Used– 4 GRND
4 RD ———— 3 TD
5 TD ———— 6 RD
6 GRND ———— 5 GRND
7 DTR ———— 7 DSR
8 CTS ———— 1 RTS

Sun StorEdge T3 Disk Tray: [Top of Page] (This information is reprinted from the Sun StorEdge T3 Disk Tray Installation, Operation, and Service Manual.)

Pin Function
1 Ground
2-3 Reserved
4 Ground
5 RXD
6 TXD

The controller card has an RS-232 serial port connector (RJ11-6). A standard serial cable is used to connect the controller service interface to a dumb terminal or computer serial port with terminal emulation.

Note: The serial port is reserved for special service procedures that can be performed only by qualified, trained service personnel. Do not attempt to perform any procedures through the serial port or you risk damaging the disk tray configuration and data.
T3B/T3+/Sun StorEdge 3900 and 6900: To connect an external serial terminal to the Storage Service Processor, use the Sun-supplied RJ45-DB9 DTE adapter, part number 530-3100-01, pinout as described in the Netra X1 link on this page, according to the Sun StorEdge 3900 and 6900 Series 1.1 Reference and Service Manual. For other connections to this device, see that Sun document.

Sun IPC and IPX CPU serial ports: [Pin ID]
Sun no longer sells the serial DIN8 to DB25 serial cable part. It’s available for about US$28 from Ultra Spec Cables.

Macintosh serial cables may also work for terminal connections (if lines 2 and 3 are crossed, as in a null-modem cable), but not for modem connections, since the Macintosh cable has no DCD line. There are several different Mac modem cables, so check that the pinout matches what you need.

Note that DB25 pin 6, 15, 22, 24, and 25 are not supported on the Sun serial port adapter cable. The left pinout below is taken from the SPARCstation IPC Installation Guide.
IPC & IPX DB25 to DIN8 Cable Pinout

DIN8 DB25 Signal Description
Pin Pin
—- —- —— ———–
1 20 DTR Data Terminal Ready
2 5 CTS Clear to Send
3 2 TXD Transmit Data
4 7 GND Ground
5 3 RXD Receive Data
6 4 RTS Request to Send
7 8 DCD Data Carrier Detect
8 17 RTXC Receive Clock
N/A 6 DSR Data Set Ready, not used
N/A 15 DB Transmit Clock, not used
N/A 22 RI Ring Indicator, not connected
N/A 24 DA Transmit Clock, not used
N/A 25 – Not connected

Mini DIN8 MacintoshPlus Serial Cable Pinout
(One of many Mac serial cables. Not all will work.)

Pin Signal Description
— —— ———–
1 HSKo Output Handshake
(Zilog 8530 DTR pin)
2 HSKi/CLK Input Handshake
OR External Clock
3 TxD- Transmit data (-)
4 Ground Signal ground
5 RxD- Receive data (-)
6 TxD+ Transmit data (+)
7 N/C (no connection)
8 RxD+ Receive data (+)

Sun Sparcstation 4, 10, 20, LX, Classic, Classic X, & Enterprise 450 CPU serial ports:
Y-cable (Sun Part number X985A) and the DB25 connector on the system unit, labeled A/B.

Reprinted from the Sun Microsystem Inc.’s Desktop SPARC Hardware Owner’s Guide (Dec ‘92) and other information. This is the pinout of the Serial Port A/B connector and the Ports A and B of the Y-Cable that attach to it.

Legend: x = active pins, o = inactive pins (or pin not there)

E450 tidbit: The E450 has its serial port set to RS-423 (+/- 5v) by default. To change it to RS-232 (+/- 12v), move the jumper at J3303 (near the parallel port) from pins 2-3 to pins 1-2. This is seldom necessary with modern serial devices, because most devices can use either voltage set. But, there are those rare times when some strange device cares about the serial port voltage.

Sun Sparcstation 4, 5, 10, 20, LX, Classic, Classic X & Ultra Enterprise 450: [Pin ID]
System Unit Back Panel Serial Connector Pinout

1 1 1 1
3 2 1 0 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
—————————————–
\ x x x o o x x x x x x x o /
\ x x o o o x x x x x x x /
————————————-
2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1
5 4 3 2 1 0 9 8 7 6 5 4

Pin Circuit Signal Direction Description/Port
— ——- —— ——— —————-
1 none none — not connected
2 BA TD output Transmit Data/A
3 BB RD input Receive Data/A
4 CA RTS output Request to Send/A
5 CB CTS input Clear to Send/A
6 CC DSR input Data Set Ready/A
7 AB SG — Signal Ground
8 CF DCD input Data Carrier
Detect/A
9-10 none none — not connected
11 SCD SDTR output Data Terminal
Ready/B
12 SCF SDCD input Data Carrier
Detect/B
13 SCB SCTS input Clear to Send/B
14 SBA STD output Transmit Data/B
15 DB TC input Transmit Clock/A
DCE source
16 SBB SRD input Receive Data/B
17 DD RC input Receive Clock/A
18 SDB STC input Transmit Clock/B
19 SCA SRTS output Request to Send/B
20 CD DTR output Data Terminal
Ready/A
21-23 none none — not connected
24 DA TC output Transmit Clock/A
DTE source
25 DA TC output Transmit Clock/B
DTE source

Sun Sparcstation 4, 5, 10, 20, LX, Classic, Classic X & Ultra Enterprise 450:
Serial Interface Y-Cable Port A Specifications – Synchronous & Asynchronous

1 1 1 1
3 2 1 0 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
—————————————–
\ o o o o o x x x x x x x o /
\ o x o o o x o o x o x o /
————————————-
2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1
5 4 3 2 1 0 9 8 7 6 5 4

Pin Circuit Signal Direction Description
— ——- —— ——— ———–
2 BA TD output Transmit Data
3 BB RD input Receive Data
4 CA RTS output Request to Send
5 CB CTS input Clear to Send
6 CC DSR input Data Set Ready
7 AB SG — Signal Ground
8 CF DCD input Data Carrier
Detect
15 DB TC input Transmit Clock,
DCE source
17 DD RC input Receive Clock
20 CD DTR output Data Terminal
Ready
24 DA TC output Transmit Clock,
DTE Source

Sun Sparcstation 4, 5, 10, 20, LX, Classic, Classic X & Ultra Enterprise 450:
Serial Interface Y-Cable Port B Specifications – Asynchronous Only

1 1 1 1
3 2 1 0 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
—————————————–
\ o o o o o x x o x x x x o /
\ o o o o o x o o o o o o /
————————————-
2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1
5 4 3 2 1 0 9 8 7 6 5 4

Pin Circuit Signal Direction Description
— ——- —— ——— ———–
2 BA TD output Transmit Data
3 BB RD input Receive Data
4 CA RTS output Request to Send
5 CB CTS input Clear to Send
7 AB SG — Signal Ground
8 CF DCD input Data Carrier
Detect
20 CD DTR output Data Terminal
Ready

Ultra 80 / Sun Blade 1000 / Sun Blade 2000 / Sun Fire 280R CPU serial ports: [Pin ID]
The serial port A and B connectors are DB25 connectors located on the motherboard back panel. The 2 ports are wired in the same way.

Pin Signal Description
— —— ———–
1 NC Not connected
2 SER_TDX_A_CONN Transmit data
3 SER_RXD_A_CONN Receive data
4 SER_RTS_A_L_CONN Ready to send
5 SER_CTS_A_L_CONN Clear to send
6 SER_DSR_A_L_CONN Data set ready
7 GND Signal ground
8 SER_DCD_A_L-CONN Data carrier detect
9 BUTTON_POR Power-on reset
10 BUTTON_XIR_L Transmit internal
reset
11 +5VDC +5 VDC
12-14 NC Not connected
15 SER_TRXC_A_L_CONN Transmit clock
16 NC Not connected
17 SER_RXC_A_L_CONN Receive clock
18-19 NC Not connected
20 SER_DTR_A_L_CONN Data terminal
ready
21-23 NC Not connected
24 SER_TXC_A_L_CONN Transmit clock
25 NC Not connected

Sun Blade 100 / 150 CPU serial port: [Pin ID]
The 1 serial port connector is a DB9 type connector located on the backpanel. The serial port connector provides asynchronous serial communications.

Pin Signal Description
— —— ———–
1 CD Carrier detect
2 RD Receive data
3 TD Transmit data
4 DTR Data terminal ready
5 GND Ground
6 DSR Data set ready
7 RTS Request to send
8 CTS Clear to send
9 RI Ring indicator

Sun Fire 880/ 3800/ 4800/ 6800 serial ports: [Top of Page] [Pin ID]
There is one DB25 serial port connector which provides both port A and port B. Use a splitter cable (Sun part # X985A) to access port B. The serial port connector provides synchronous and asynchronous serial communications. The other ports on the 880 are described in the Sun Fire 880 Server Owner’s Guide.

Pin Signal Pin Signal
— —— — ——
1 No Connection 14 Transmit Data B
2 Transmit Data A 15 Transmit Clock A
3 Receive Data A (External)
4 Ready To Send A 16 Receive Data B
5 Clear To Send A 17 Receive Clock A
6 Synchronous A 18 Receive Clock B
7 Signal Ground A 19 Ready To Send B
8 Data Carrier 20 Data Terminal
Detect A Ready A
9 No Connection 21 No Connection
10 No Connection 22 No Connection
11 Data Terminal 23 No Connection
Ready B 24 Transmit Clock A
12 Data Carrier (Internal)
Detect B 25 Transmit Clock B
13 Clear To Send B

Sun Serial Parallel Controller (SPC): [Top of Page] [Pin ID]
This device, part numbers F501-1511 or F501-1931, uses an SBUS card to connect to a patch panel containing 8 full-duplex DB25 serial ports (RS-232 or RS-423) and 1 unidirectional Centronics parallel port. The serial ports support baud rates of 50 to 38.4K, with 135K baud total throughut. More information is available from the Sun Serial Parallel Controller User’s Guide.

DB25 Serial Ports

Pin Signal
— ——
1 Frame Ground
2 TXD
3 RXD
4 RTS
5 CTS
6 DSR
7 Signal Ground
8 CD
20 DTR

Netra 240 serial ports: [Top of Page] [Pin ID]
There are 2 serial ports. The RJ45 port is labeled SERIAL MGT and the DB9 port is labeled SERIAL (10101). The RJ45 SERIAL MGT port should be used only for console server management. The DB9 SERIAL (10101) port is for general purpose serial data transfers.

RJ45 SERIAL MGMT Console port

Pin Signal Pin Signal
— —— — ——
1 Request to Send 5 Ground
2 Data Terminal Ready 6 Receive Data
3 Transmit Data 7 Data Set Ready
4 Ground 8 Clear to Send

If you need to connect to the SERIAL MGT port using a cable with either a DB9 or a DB25 connector, use the adapter supplied with the machine to perform the crossovers given for each connector. Pinouts for the adapters are given below.

RJ45 to DB9 Adapter RJ45 to DB25
Crossover Crossover

RJ45 connector DB9 Adapter RJ45 connector DB25 Adapter
Pin Signal Pin Signal Pin Signal Pin Signal
— —— — —— — —— — ——
1 RTS ——– 8 CTS 1 RTS ——— 5 CTS
2 DTR ——– 6 DSR 2 DTR ——— 6 DSR
3 TXD ——– 2 RXD 3 TXD ——— 3 RXD
4 GROUND —– 5 GROUND 4 GROUND —— 7 GROUND
5 GROUND —– 5 GROUND 5 GROUND —— 7 GROUND
6 RXD ——– 3 TXD 6 RXD ——— 2 TXD
7 DSR ——– 4 DTR 7 DSR ——— 20 DTR
8 CTS ——– 7 RTS 8 CTS ——— 4 RTS

DB9 SERIAL (10101) port

Pin Signal Pin Signal
— —— — ——
1 Data Carrier Detect 6 Data Set Ready
2 Receive Data 7 Request to Send
3 Transmit Data 8 Clear to Send
4 Data Terminal Ready 9 Ring Indicator
5 Ground