How do I use a Windows PC for a Sun serial console?

How do I use a Windows PC for a Sun serial console?

Wire up a serial cable from the Sun’s serial cable to one of the PC serial
ports. PC serial ports are usually (but not always) DB9 (9-pin), while Sun
serial console ports are usually (but not always) 25-pin (DB25). You
generally need to connect them through a "null modem adapter".
For more information on serial ports, see Celeste Stokeley’s
UNIX serial port resources page, at
http://www.stokely.com/unix.serial.port.resources/

The next problem is that the version of Hyperterminal which comes with some
versions of Windows cannot generate a BREAK signal. You can obtain a new
version of Hyperterminal from
http://www.hilgraeve.com/htpe/index.html
There are many free alternative terminal programs. Special mention should
be made of TeraTerm:
http://hp.vector.co.jp/authors/VA002416/teraterm.html
which is also available (as TTSSH) with SSH support, at:
http://www.zip.com.au/~roca/ttssh.html

Null modem is a communication method to connect two DTEs (computer, terminal, printer etc.) directly using a RS-232 serial cable
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Null_modem

Serial Port & Cable Pinouts

SUN serial port pinouts

SUN serial port pinouts

Sun ELC and SLC CPU serial ports:[Pin ID]
The Sun part number is for the ELC serial port splitter cable is X985Q. The SLC serial port splitter cable is Sun part # 530-1667. The pinout below is from the May 1993 Sun FE Handbook.

Pin Signal Port Pin Signal Port
2 TD A 13 CTS B
3 RD A 14 TD B
4 RTS A 15 TC A
5 CTS A 16 RD B
6 DSR A 17 RC A
7 GND A 19 RTS B
8 DCD A 20 DTR A
12 DCD B 24 TCO A

SPARCstation 2:[Pin ID] The SPARCstation 2 has 2 DB25, 25-pin serial ports:

Pin Signal Description
2 TxD output
3 RxD input
4 RTS output
5 CTS input
6 DSR input
7 GND
8 DCD input
20 DTR output

Ultra 1/ 2/ 30/ 60, Enterprise 150/ 220R/ 250/ 3000/ 3500/ 4500/ 5000/ 5500/ 6500, Netra t 1120/ 1125/ 1400/ 1405, SPARCstation 5: [Pin ID] These machines have 2 DB25, 25-pin RS-423/RS-232 serial ports:

Pin Signal Description
2 TxD output Transmit Data
3 RxD input Receive Data
4 RTS output Request to Send
5 CTS input Clear to Send
6 DSR input Data Set Ready
7 GND Ground
8 DCD input Data Carrier Detect
9-14 none Not connected
15 TRxC input1 Transmit Clock input1
16 none Not connected
17 RTxC input2 Receive Clock2
18-19 none Not connected
20 DTR output Data Terminal Ready
21-23 none Not connected
24 TxC output3 Transmit Clock output3
25 none Not Connected

Notes:
1 Enterprise 6500/5500/4500/3500/3000 labels this as DB. 2 Enterprise 6500/5500/4500/3500/3000 labels this as DD. 3 Enterprise 6500/5500/4500/3500/3000 labels this as DA.

Enterprise 420R: [Pin ID] This machine has 2 DB25, 25-pin RS-423/RS-232 serial ports:

Pin Signal Description
2 TxD output Transmit Data
3 RxD input Receive Data
4 RTS output Request to Send
5 CTS input Clear to Send
6 DSR input Data Set Ready
7 GND Ground
8 DCD input Data Carrier Detect
9 BUTTON_POR To be determined
10 BUTTON_XIR_L To be determined
11 +5Vdc +5 VDC
12-14 none Not connected
15 TRxC input Transmit Clock
16 none Not connected
17 RTxC input Receive Clock
18-19 none Not connected
20 DTR output Data Terminal Ready
21-23 none Not connected
24 TxC output Transmit Clock
25 none Not Connected

Ultra 5/ 10: [Pin ID] Port A is a DB25, Port B is a DB9:

Serial Port A (DB25)
Pin Signal Description
2 TxD output Transmit Data
3 RxD input Receive Data
4 RTS output Request to Send
5 CTS input Clear to Send
6 DSR input Data Set Ready
7 GND Ground
8 DCD input Data Carrier Detect
9-14 none Not connected
15 TRxC input Transmit Clock
16 none Not connected
17 RTxC input Receive Clock
20 DTR output Data Terminal Ready
21-23 none Not connected
24 TxC output Transmit Clock
25 none Not Connected

Serial Port B (DB9)
Pin Signal Description
1 CD Carrier Detect
2 RD Receive Data
3 TD Transmit Data
4 DTR Data Terminal Ready
5 GND Ground
6 DSR Data Set Ready
7 RTS Request to Send
8 CTS Clear to Send
9 RI Ring Indicator

Netra ft 1800: [Pin ID]
The Netra ft 1800 has 1 female DB25 Console Port, 1 female DB25 Modem Port, and 1 female DB9 Remote Control Processor (RCP) Port.

Modem port (DB25)
Pin Signal
1 Ground
2 TxD
3 RxD
4 RTS
5 CTS
7 SREF (Signal Reference)
8 DCD
20 DTR
Shield Ground

Console port (DB25)
Pin Signal Description
1 GND Chassis Ground
2 TxD Output Data
3 RxD Input Data
7 SREF Signal Reference
Shield — Chassis Ground

RCP port (DB9)
Pin Signal
2 TxD
3 RxD
5 SREF (Signal Reference)
Shield Ground

Netra X1, 1280, t1 Model 105/AC200/DC200, Sun Fire V100/ V120/ V480/ V1280: [Pin ID] These machines have RJ45 connectors for serial ports.

Modems: The V100 and V120 have no DCD line on their serial ports, but they map DSR to DCD on at least port B. (Strange, but true). We do not believe that you can put a modem on the Netra X1, 1280, t1 Model 105/AC200/DC200, or Sun Fire V480 or V1280.

Configure the modem cable on Port B with the pinout shown to the right.

Sun InfoDoc 47436, available via login to contract customers only, at sunsolve.sun.com has a bit more information on setting up a modem for the V100/V120.

Signal RJ45 DB25 Modem
RTS 1 — 4
DTR 2 — 20
TXD 3 — 2
Signal Ground 4 — 1
Signal Ground 5 — 7
RXD 6 — 3
DSR(DCD) 7 — 8
CTS 8 — 5

On the Netra X1 and Sun Fire V100, Port A LOM is dedicated to the Lights Out Management (LOM) device in the server. The Netra 1280/Sun Fire V1280 machines reserve port B for some non-user use. Only use port A.

One of this site’s readers says that the Cisco Modem RJ45 – DB25 adapter works just fine as a replacement for the Sun adapter with a terminal on the console port of an X1. It probably works well with the other systems listed in this section, too. The Cisco adapter is light grey, embossed with MODEM CAB-5MODCM on one side and 29-0881-01 on the other.

RJ45 – DB25 RS232 serial converter cable, RJ45 – DB9 serial cable: Below are pinouts for an RJ45 – DB25 RS232 serial converter cable, part number 530-2889-01 and a RJ45 – DB9 serial cable, part number 530-3100-xx. (There is also an unknown part number which has the same pinout except that the RJ45 BODY (black) is wired to RS232 pin 1 GND.)

Note that these are wired DCE. If you use the supplied RJ45 to DB25 RS232 adapter, you get a null-modem cable, suitable for a terminal connection.

Machine Sun serial DB25 Machine DB9 adapter
RJ45 RS-232 adapter RJ45 RS-232 Pin
Pin part # 530-2889-01 Pin part # 530-3100-xx
1 (RTS) blue — 5 (CTS) 1 (RTS) blue — 8 (CTS)
2 (DTR) orange — 6 (DSR) 2 (DTR) orange — 6 (DSR)
3 (TXD) black — 3 (RXD) 3 (TXD) black — 2 (RXD)
4 (GND) red — 7 (GND) 4 (GND) red — 5 (GND)
5 (GND) green — 7 (GND) 5 (GND) green — 5 (GND)
6 (RXD) yellow — 2 (TXD) 6 (RXD) yellow — 3 (TXD)
7 (DSR) brown — 20 (DTR) 7 (DSR) brown — 4 (DTR)
8 (CTS) gray — 4 (RTS) 8 (CTS) gray — 7 (RTS)

V100 – Xylogics Remote Annex 4000 Series: A reader sent us this pinout for connecting a Sun V100 to a Xylogics Remote Annex 4000 Series. (This cable pinout will connect the Annex to the RSC card on any Enterprise and Sun Fire level servers as well as the V440. It’s not just for the V100.)

Check the signal names and pin numbers for the port on your Annex model, because the pinouts vary. Match the signal names to determine your wiring needs.

V100 LOM RJ45 ANNEX RJ45
Pin Signal Pin Signal
8 CTS — 1 RTS
7 DSR — 2 DTR
6 RXD — 3 TXD
4 GND — 6 GND
3 TXD — 5 RXD
2 DTR — 7 DSR
1 RTS — 8 CTS

Vx Series Servers – Avocent CPS-810/1600 series console servers: A reader sent us this pinout for connecting Sun Vx Series Servers to Avocent CPS-810/1600 series console servers.

Adaptor Part # 210105, 10′ Reversing Cable Part # 690226

The following diagram shows the pinout for a CPS flatwire to SUN serial RJ45 connection; it can be used to create a custom adaptor cable between the units. This should work on all SUN servers with an RJ45 serial connection.

CPS SUN
Pin Signal Pin Signal
1 RTS ———— 8 CTS
2 DSR ———— 2 DTR
3 CD –Not Used– 4 GRND
4 RD ———— 3 TD
5 TD ———— 6 RD
6 GRND ———— 5 GRND
7 DTR ———— 7 DSR
8 CTS ———— 1 RTS

Sun StorEdge T3 Disk Tray: [Top of Page] (This information is reprinted from the Sun StorEdge T3 Disk Tray Installation, Operation, and Service Manual.)

Pin Function
1 Ground
2-3 Reserved
4 Ground
5 RXD
6 TXD

The controller card has an RS-232 serial port connector (RJ11-6). A standard serial cable is used to connect the controller service interface to a dumb terminal or computer serial port with terminal emulation.

Note: The serial port is reserved for special service procedures that can be performed only by qualified, trained service personnel. Do not attempt to perform any procedures through the serial port or you risk damaging the disk tray configuration and data.
T3B/T3+/Sun StorEdge 3900 and 6900: To connect an external serial terminal to the Storage Service Processor, use the Sun-supplied RJ45-DB9 DTE adapter, part number 530-3100-01, pinout as described in the Netra X1 link on this page, according to the Sun StorEdge 3900 and 6900 Series 1.1 Reference and Service Manual. For other connections to this device, see that Sun document.

Sun IPC and IPX CPU serial ports: [Pin ID]
Sun no longer sells the serial DIN8 to DB25 serial cable part. It’s available for about US$28 from Ultra Spec Cables.

Macintosh serial cables may also work for terminal connections (if lines 2 and 3 are crossed, as in a null-modem cable), but not for modem connections, since the Macintosh cable has no DCD line. There are several different Mac modem cables, so check that the pinout matches what you need.

Note that DB25 pin 6, 15, 22, 24, and 25 are not supported on the Sun serial port adapter cable. The left pinout below is taken from the SPARCstation IPC Installation Guide.
IPC & IPX DB25 to DIN8 Cable Pinout

DIN8 DB25 Signal Description
Pin Pin
—- —- —— ———–
1 20 DTR Data Terminal Ready
2 5 CTS Clear to Send
3 2 TXD Transmit Data
4 7 GND Ground
5 3 RXD Receive Data
6 4 RTS Request to Send
7 8 DCD Data Carrier Detect
8 17 RTXC Receive Clock
N/A 6 DSR Data Set Ready, not used
N/A 15 DB Transmit Clock, not used
N/A 22 RI Ring Indicator, not connected
N/A 24 DA Transmit Clock, not used
N/A 25 – Not connected

Mini DIN8 MacintoshPlus Serial Cable Pinout
(One of many Mac serial cables. Not all will work.)

Pin Signal Description
— —— ———–
1 HSKo Output Handshake
(Zilog 8530 DTR pin)
2 HSKi/CLK Input Handshake
OR External Clock
3 TxD- Transmit data (-)
4 Ground Signal ground
5 RxD- Receive data (-)
6 TxD+ Transmit data (+)
7 N/C (no connection)
8 RxD+ Receive data (+)

Sun Sparcstation 4, 10, 20, LX, Classic, Classic X, & Enterprise 450 CPU serial ports:
Y-cable (Sun Part number X985A) and the DB25 connector on the system unit, labeled A/B.

Reprinted from the Sun Microsystem Inc.’s Desktop SPARC Hardware Owner’s Guide (Dec ‘92) and other information. This is the pinout of the Serial Port A/B connector and the Ports A and B of the Y-Cable that attach to it.

Legend: x = active pins, o = inactive pins (or pin not there)

E450 tidbit: The E450 has its serial port set to RS-423 (+/- 5v) by default. To change it to RS-232 (+/- 12v), move the jumper at J3303 (near the parallel port) from pins 2-3 to pins 1-2. This is seldom necessary with modern serial devices, because most devices can use either voltage set. But, there are those rare times when some strange device cares about the serial port voltage.

Sun Sparcstation 4, 5, 10, 20, LX, Classic, Classic X & Ultra Enterprise 450: [Pin ID]
System Unit Back Panel Serial Connector Pinout

1 1 1 1
3 2 1 0 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
—————————————–
\ x x x o o x x x x x x x o /
\ x x o o o x x x x x x x /
————————————-
2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1
5 4 3 2 1 0 9 8 7 6 5 4

Pin Circuit Signal Direction Description/Port
— ——- —— ——— —————-
1 none none — not connected
2 BA TD output Transmit Data/A
3 BB RD input Receive Data/A
4 CA RTS output Request to Send/A
5 CB CTS input Clear to Send/A
6 CC DSR input Data Set Ready/A
7 AB SG — Signal Ground
8 CF DCD input Data Carrier
Detect/A
9-10 none none — not connected
11 SCD SDTR output Data Terminal
Ready/B
12 SCF SDCD input Data Carrier
Detect/B
13 SCB SCTS input Clear to Send/B
14 SBA STD output Transmit Data/B
15 DB TC input Transmit Clock/A
DCE source
16 SBB SRD input Receive Data/B
17 DD RC input Receive Clock/A
18 SDB STC input Transmit Clock/B
19 SCA SRTS output Request to Send/B
20 CD DTR output Data Terminal
Ready/A
21-23 none none — not connected
24 DA TC output Transmit Clock/A
DTE source
25 DA TC output Transmit Clock/B
DTE source

Sun Sparcstation 4, 5, 10, 20, LX, Classic, Classic X & Ultra Enterprise 450:
Serial Interface Y-Cable Port A Specifications – Synchronous & Asynchronous

1 1 1 1
3 2 1 0 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
—————————————–
\ o o o o o x x x x x x x o /
\ o x o o o x o o x o x o /
————————————-
2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1
5 4 3 2 1 0 9 8 7 6 5 4

Pin Circuit Signal Direction Description
— ——- —— ——— ———–
2 BA TD output Transmit Data
3 BB RD input Receive Data
4 CA RTS output Request to Send
5 CB CTS input Clear to Send
6 CC DSR input Data Set Ready
7 AB SG — Signal Ground
8 CF DCD input Data Carrier
Detect
15 DB TC input Transmit Clock,
DCE source
17 DD RC input Receive Clock
20 CD DTR output Data Terminal
Ready
24 DA TC output Transmit Clock,
DTE Source

Sun Sparcstation 4, 5, 10, 20, LX, Classic, Classic X & Ultra Enterprise 450:
Serial Interface Y-Cable Port B Specifications – Asynchronous Only

1 1 1 1
3 2 1 0 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
—————————————–
\ o o o o o x x o x x x x o /
\ o o o o o x o o o o o o /
————————————-
2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1
5 4 3 2 1 0 9 8 7 6 5 4

Pin Circuit Signal Direction Description
— ——- —— ——— ———–
2 BA TD output Transmit Data
3 BB RD input Receive Data
4 CA RTS output Request to Send
5 CB CTS input Clear to Send
7 AB SG — Signal Ground
8 CF DCD input Data Carrier
Detect
20 CD DTR output Data Terminal
Ready

Ultra 80 / Sun Blade 1000 / Sun Blade 2000 / Sun Fire 280R CPU serial ports: [Pin ID]
The serial port A and B connectors are DB25 connectors located on the motherboard back panel. The 2 ports are wired in the same way.

Pin Signal Description
— —— ———–
1 NC Not connected
2 SER_TDX_A_CONN Transmit data
3 SER_RXD_A_CONN Receive data
4 SER_RTS_A_L_CONN Ready to send
5 SER_CTS_A_L_CONN Clear to send
6 SER_DSR_A_L_CONN Data set ready
7 GND Signal ground
8 SER_DCD_A_L-CONN Data carrier detect
9 BUTTON_POR Power-on reset
10 BUTTON_XIR_L Transmit internal
reset
11 +5VDC +5 VDC
12-14 NC Not connected
15 SER_TRXC_A_L_CONN Transmit clock
16 NC Not connected
17 SER_RXC_A_L_CONN Receive clock
18-19 NC Not connected
20 SER_DTR_A_L_CONN Data terminal
ready
21-23 NC Not connected
24 SER_TXC_A_L_CONN Transmit clock
25 NC Not connected

Sun Blade 100 / 150 CPU serial port: [Pin ID]
The 1 serial port connector is a DB9 type connector located on the backpanel. The serial port connector provides asynchronous serial communications.

Pin Signal Description
— —— ———–
1 CD Carrier detect
2 RD Receive data
3 TD Transmit data
4 DTR Data terminal ready
5 GND Ground
6 DSR Data set ready
7 RTS Request to send
8 CTS Clear to send
9 RI Ring indicator

Sun Fire 880/ 3800/ 4800/ 6800 serial ports: [Top of Page] [Pin ID]
There is one DB25 serial port connector which provides both port A and port B. Use a splitter cable (Sun part # X985A) to access port B. The serial port connector provides synchronous and asynchronous serial communications. The other ports on the 880 are described in the Sun Fire 880 Server Owner’s Guide.

Pin Signal Pin Signal
— —— — ——
1 No Connection 14 Transmit Data B
2 Transmit Data A 15 Transmit Clock A
3 Receive Data A (External)
4 Ready To Send A 16 Receive Data B
5 Clear To Send A 17 Receive Clock A
6 Synchronous A 18 Receive Clock B
7 Signal Ground A 19 Ready To Send B
8 Data Carrier 20 Data Terminal
Detect A Ready A
9 No Connection 21 No Connection
10 No Connection 22 No Connection
11 Data Terminal 23 No Connection
Ready B 24 Transmit Clock A
12 Data Carrier (Internal)
Detect B 25 Transmit Clock B
13 Clear To Send B

Sun Serial Parallel Controller (SPC): [Top of Page] [Pin ID]
This device, part numbers F501-1511 or F501-1931, uses an SBUS card to connect to a patch panel containing 8 full-duplex DB25 serial ports (RS-232 or RS-423) and 1 unidirectional Centronics parallel port. The serial ports support baud rates of 50 to 38.4K, with 135K baud total throughut. More information is available from the Sun Serial Parallel Controller User’s Guide.

DB25 Serial Ports

Pin Signal
— ——
1 Frame Ground
2 TXD
3 RXD
4 RTS
5 CTS
6 DSR
7 Signal Ground
8 CD
20 DTR

Netra 240 serial ports: [Top of Page] [Pin ID]
There are 2 serial ports. The RJ45 port is labeled SERIAL MGT and the DB9 port is labeled SERIAL (10101). The RJ45 SERIAL MGT port should be used only for console server management. The DB9 SERIAL (10101) port is for general purpose serial data transfers.

RJ45 SERIAL MGMT Console port

Pin Signal Pin Signal
— —— — ——
1 Request to Send 5 Ground
2 Data Terminal Ready 6 Receive Data
3 Transmit Data 7 Data Set Ready
4 Ground 8 Clear to Send

If you need to connect to the SERIAL MGT port using a cable with either a DB9 or a DB25 connector, use the adapter supplied with the machine to perform the crossovers given for each connector. Pinouts for the adapters are given below.

RJ45 to DB9 Adapter RJ45 to DB25
Crossover Crossover

RJ45 connector DB9 Adapter RJ45 connector DB25 Adapter
Pin Signal Pin Signal Pin Signal Pin Signal
— —— — —— — —— — ——
1 RTS ——– 8 CTS 1 RTS ——— 5 CTS
2 DTR ——– 6 DSR 2 DTR ——— 6 DSR
3 TXD ——– 2 RXD 3 TXD ——— 3 RXD
4 GROUND —– 5 GROUND 4 GROUND —— 7 GROUND
5 GROUND —– 5 GROUND 5 GROUND —— 7 GROUND
6 RXD ——– 3 TXD 6 RXD ——— 2 TXD
7 DSR ——– 4 DTR 7 DSR ——— 20 DTR
8 CTS ——– 7 RTS 8 CTS ——— 4 RTS

DB9 SERIAL (10101) port

Pin Signal Pin Signal
— —— — ——
1 Data Carrier Detect 6 Data Set Ready
2 Receive Data 7 Request to Send
3 Transmit Data 8 Clear to Send
4 Data Terminal Ready 9 Ring Indicator
5 Ground

prtdiag dimm vs. physical dimm

Sun Enterprise Classic Servers (3×00, 4×00, 6×00)
Rule: Physical DIMM Size = "MB" entry in prtdiag divided by 8.

"MB" entry in prtdiag shows:

64MB 256MB 1024MB 2048MB

Physical DIMM size is:

8MB 32MB 128MB 256MB

Sun Enterprise 10000 Server (E10K)
Rule: Physical DIMM Size = "Memory Unit Size" entry in prtdiag divided by 8.

"Memory Unit Size" entry in prtdiag shows:

256MB 1024MB

Physical DIMM size is:

32MB 128MB

Lightweight 8 Servers (n1280/n1290/v1280/v1290/E2900)
Rule: Physical DIMM Size = "Size" entry in prtdiag divided by 2.

"Size" entry in prtdiag shows:

512MB 1024MB 2048MB

Physical DIMM size is:

256MB 512MB 1024MB (1GB)

Sun Fire Serengeti Servers (3800/48×0/E4900/6800/E6900)
Rule: Physical DIMM Size = "DIMM Size" entry in prtdiag.

"DIMM Size" in prtdiag IS the Physical DIMM size.

Sun Fire Starcat Servers (E12K/E15K/E20K/E25K)
Rule: Physical DIMM Size = "DIMM Size" entry in prtdiag.

"DIMM Size" in prtdiag IS the Physical DIMM size.

T2000 upgrading firmware from the SC console

T2000 upgrading firmware from the SC console

When upgrading the firmware from the SC prompt, you must have already downloaded the new Sun System Firmware image from the SunSolve site to a local FTP (TFTP) server accessible by the system, whose firmware you are upgrading. Before using the \’flashupdate\’ command, make sure that the system is in powered-off state. From the System Controller, issue the poweroff command (this sequence will take about 60 seconds to completely power the server off):

sc> poweroff
Are you sure you want to power off the system [y/n]? y

sc>
SC Alert: SC Request to Power Off Host.
SC Alert: Host system has shut down.
sc>

Also make sure that your virtual keyswitch setting is not in the LOCKED position. You can check the setting from the System Controller with the following command:

sc> showkeyswitch

If the virtual key switch is in LOCKED position you can change that with the following command:

sc> setkeyswitch -y normal

Ensure that the SC network management port is configured and use the correct syntax of the \’flashupdate\’ command:

sc> flashupdate -s >ipaddr< -f >pathname<

where:

>ipaddr< is the IP address of the local FTP server

>pathname< is the path to the firmware image is stored on the FTP server. This includes the file name of the patch.

Resume operations by powering on the system and boot the operating system.

From the System Controller power on the system and start Solaris.

sc> poweron -c

SC Alert: Host System has Reset

FATAL: system is not bootable, boot command is disabled OBP message

This type of a warning can appear on systems such as a Sun Fire[TM] V880.

In most cases, this warning occurs at the OBP "ok" prompt if the power-up
initialization (right after the banner was displayed) was aborted. Usually,
this is done by using the Stop-A keystroke (XIR Reset).

If after such an occurrence "boot" command is executed, the system displays
the following error:

{1} ok boot
FATAL: OpenBoot initialization sequence prematurely terminated.
FATAL: system is not bootable, boot command is disabled

The system at that point does not boot.

In most cases, this just means that since the proper initialization of the
machine wasn’t allowed to complete, the system is unable to boot. This is
done to make sure that OS deamons (such as picld) do not have problems as
they start up during boot (because of the improperly initialized memory,
etc.).

To get the machine to boot properly, issue the "reset-all" command.

If for whatever reason there is a need for the "boot" command to be
executed manually, please run the following command sequence at the "ok" prompt:

ok setenv auto-boot? false
ok reset-all

Now, the machine will reset. Allow it to fully initialize. It will then
give the ok prompt without booting automatically.

At this point if the "boot" command is manually executed, it should work
without errors. Also, before running the manual boot, the "auto-boot?"
variable could be set back to "true". This way, the system will again be
set back to its original setting for the next time it is reset or power
cycled.

NOTE: Seeing the "FATAL: system is not bootable …" message even
after following the above procedure most likely indicates a real problem
(possibly a hardware problem) with that machine. Another possibility may be an
invalid setting. If you suspect this you can use the following procedure. This
procedure resets all parameters to factory default settings, so use caution.

ok printenv ### save this information ###
ok set-defaults ### to reset all parameters to factory default settings ###
ok reset-all

NVRAM Settings Before Running POST

NVRAM Settings Before Running POST
———————————-

Perform the following at the OK prompt:

ok printenv diag-switch?
diag-switch?=false

ok setenv diag-switch? true

ok printenv diag-level
diag-level=max

ok setenv diag-level min
ok setenv diag-level max

Initializing POST
—————–

To initilalize POST set the diag-switch? to true and the diag-level to max or
min.
followed by a power cycle of the system.

How to invoke obdiag?

How to invoke obdiag?
=====================
Simply type obdiag at the OK prompt.

ok>obdiag

The menu will be displayed showing the available tests.

To run a test, simply type "test" followed by the test numbers.

Example: obdiag> test 2,23,16

Example of running test-all without arguments:

obdiag> test-all
Testing /pci@9,600000/TSI,gfxp@1
Testing /pci@9,700000/usb@1,3
Testing /pci@9,700000/network@1,1
Testing /pci@9,700000/ebus@1
Testing /pci@9,700000/ebus@1/serial@1,400000
Testing /pci@9,700000/ebus@1/rsc-control@1,3062f8
Testing /pci@9,700000/ebus@1/pmc@1,300700
Testing /pci@9,700000/ebus@1/gpio@1,300600
Testing /pci@9,700000/ebus@1/rtc@1,300070
Testing /pci@9,700000/ebus@1/i2c@1,500030
Testing /pci@9,700000/ebus@1/i2c@1,50002e
Testing /pci@9,700000/ebus@1/bbc@1,500000
Testing /pci@9,700000/ebus@1/i2c@1,30
Testing /pci@9,700000/ebus@1/i2c@1,2e
Testing /pci@9,700000/ebus@1/bbc@1,0
Testing /pci@9,700000/ebus@1/flashprom@0,0
Testing /pci@9,700000/ebus@1/i2c@1,30/hotplug-controller@0,ec
Testing /pci@9,700000/ebus@1/i2c@1,30/hotplug-controller@0,e8
Testing /pci@9,700000/ebus@1/i2c@1,30/hotplug-controller@0,e6
Testing /pci@9,700000/ebus@1/i2c@1,30/hotplug-controller@0,e2
Testing /pci@8,600000/SUNW,qlc@2 Testing /pci@8,600000/network@1
Testing /pci@8,700000/scsi@1
ok

A comparison of the coverage provided by OBDiag and POST is shown in the
following table:

OBDiag and POST Diagnostic Coverage:

=============================================================================
OBDiag Diagnostic Coverage POST Diagnostic Coverage
===================================== =================================
On-board I/O channels such as serial Core CPU function such as Caches,
ports, parallel port, audio, graphics MMU, etc.
————————– ————————–
On-board boot devices such as SCSI, Main system memory
Ethernet, floppy
————————– ————————–
Other "non-core" motherboard devices Primary system busses
such as FLASH, NVRAM and Environmental
controls
————————– ————————–
Plug-in cards with native FCode drivers Miscellaneous other motherboard
which support the IEEE 1275 selftest functions
mechanism
=============================================================================

For a complete list of options and documentation on OBDiag, there is a
copy of the "OBDiag Theory Of Operation" manual under:

"http://pts-americas.east/vsp/desktop/products/ultra5/troubleshooting_index.html

Hardware RAID usage on the T2000

Enabling Hardware RAID and Required Patches:

The Sun Fire[TM] T2000 server supports the following RAID configurations:

*

Integrated Stripe or IS volumes (RAID0)
*

Integrated Mirror or IM volumes (RAID1)

Before using the Hardware RAID features of the Sun Fire T2000 server, ensure that the following patches have been applied:

*

119850-13 mpt and raidctl patch
*

122165-01 LSI1064 PCI-X FCode 1.00.39

Note: To confirm the installed PCI-X FCode revision see the patch README. The ALOM showhost command cannot be used as this command queries the onboard (currently inactive) LSI chip firmware and will not show the correct version.

NOTE: Mirroring the boot disks is typically done prior installing the OS since the RAID controller requires usage of 64MB of each disk in the RAID. This must be completed using the procedure documented in the "Sun Fire T2000 Server Product Notes" which is the top link from:

http://www.sun.com/products-n-solutions/hardware/docs/Servers/coolthreads/t2000/index.html
Document Body:

This document describes hardware RAID functionality, practical usage, and specifications on the Niagara-based Sun Fire T2000 server. The Sun Fire T2000 server currently utilizes an LSI SAS1064 chipset and a 4 PHY-wide SAS HBA with up to four (4) 72G 2.5" SAS disk drives as well as support for RAID0 (Striping) and RAID1 (Mirroring).

SAS (Serial Attached SCSI) provides:

*

A serial, full-duplex point-to-point topology.
*

Up to 3Gb/s per port.
*

Smaller form factor hard disk drives.
*

Advanced command queuing.
*

Full interface compatibility with SATA components.

The two Solaris[TM] Operating System components of Sun Fire T2000 RAID functionality are:

-mpt: Solaris kernel module for support of LSI Logic MPI-enabled HBAs.
There is current support for the LSI1030 and LSI1064 HBAs.

-raidctl(1M): Solaris utility to interface with the built-in RAID
functionality of MPI HBAs.

RAID levels available:

RAID1: Mirroring

*

A 2-disk primary->secondary configuration.
*

Upon creation, secondary is populated with primary’s data (sync).
*

All write I/Os are committed to both disks before returning to provide for data redundancy.
*

Read I/Os may be serviced by either disk.
*

When a single disk fails, data is still available, but the volume is in "DEGRADED" mode. The failed disk may be replaced and resync’ed.
*

Once sync is complete, mirroring may be disabled/broken to provide two (2) separate drives with the same exact data.

RAID0: Striping

*

A 2 or more disk configuration.
*

No data is shared. Data is across all concatenated disks in exactly one (1) location.
*

Write I/Os are committed in a round-robin fashion across all member disks. Performance is increased in some workload scenarios.
*

Read I/Os are satisfied at their one location, performing as a single disk.
*

Upon a single disk failure, data is lost.
*

If a RAID0 volume is disabled/broken, data is lost.

Operations Summary:

Create a mirror:

raidctl -c [-r 1] primary secondary

Create a stripe:

raidctl -c -r 0 disk1 disk2 [disk3] . . .

Delete a RAID volume:

raidctl -d volume

Display RAID volumes:

raidctl

Update HBA controller firmware:

raidctl -F [path_of_image_file] [controller#]

RAID Operation Details

Creating a mirror

Format:

raidctl -c [-r 1] primary secondary

Example:

# raidctl -c c1t0d0 c1t1d0

With the above command issued, a RAID volume c1t0d0 will be created. Data on c1t0d0 will be synced to c1t1d0, which will overwrite data on c1t1d0. No file systems may be mounted on the secondary disk. The secondary disk must be as large as the primary disk for successful creation. The RAID volume will end up having the total capacity of just one disk.

Creating a stripe

Format:

raidctl -c -r 0 disk1 disk2 [disk3] . . .

Example:

# raidctl -c -r 0 c1t1d0 c1t2d0 c1t3d0

When the above command is issued, RAID volume c1t1d0 will be created. Data on all the drives will be destroyed, and no file systems may be mounted on any individual disk. The RAID volume will have have the capacity of all the disks combined (The smallest common size is used).

Deleting a RAID volume

Format:

raidctl -d volume

Example:

# raidctl -d c0t0d0

When the above command is issued, the RAID volume will be deleted. Data may be lost depending on the RAID configuration. Please see the RAID descriptions above.

Checking RAID status

Example:

# raidctl

Example output:

RAID RAID RAID Disk
Volume Status Disk Status
—————————————-
c0t0d0 RESYNCING c0t0d0 OK
c0t1d0 OK

The volume (RAID) status can be one of four possible:

*

OK: Volume is optimal.
*

DEGRADED: Volume contains a failed disk (mirror) or is running with reduced functionality.
*

RESYNCING: Volume is synchronizing (mirror), disks are sync’ing.
*

FAILED: Volume is non-functional/offline.

The disk status can be one of three possible:

*

OK: Disk is operating normally.
*

MISSING: Disk is removed or otherwise offline.
*

FAILED: Disk is in a failed state and needs service.

After RAID volume creation

*

Member disk drives are no longer visible, only the RAID volume is presented.
*

The RAID volume may be addressed just as any other LUN in Solaris.
*

The status of the RAID volume and its member disks may be retrieved using the raidctl(1M) command.
*

LSI1064 HBA supports up to 2 RAID volumes at any one time.
*

After RAID volume creation a valid Solaris label must be applied so that the new volume can be accessed correctly by the OS. Please see InfoDoc 85320 for detailed steps.